Blog

Paul Castellanos operating on vocal cords

Attending “AOICON 10th South Zone & 32nd Karnataka State Annual Conference 2014” in Bangalore, October 10-12, 2014 as faculty, the meeting is fascinating for many interesting ideas. In particular, the internal approach to repositioning of the arytenoid by Paul Castellanos opened my eyes to a new method of laryngeal framework surgery. Paul’s idea for altering the larynx consists of entering the vocal cord by a microlaryngeal incision through the aryepiglottic fold - false cord junction. Cutting cleanly with a programmable CO2 laser, a pocket is created and the arytenoid can be maneuvered.

Voice course Barcelona

There is a practical course on functional diagnosis of voice disorders coming up in Barcelona, Spain - Voice Course Barcelona. The speakers are a great group of presenters!  Ferran Ferran Vilà,  ENT and phonosurgeon. Barcelona (Course director) Cori Casanova, Phoniatrician. Barcelona (Course director) Bruno Coulombeau, Phoniatrician. Lyon Romain Perouse, ENT and phonosurgeon. Lyon Markus Hess, ENT, phonosurgeon and phoniatrician. Hamburg Nieto, P. Phoniatrician. Valencia Dalmau, J. ENT and phonosurgeon. Valencia   Botey, Q. Psychologist and voice therapist.

Vocal nodules or vocal calluses viewed during stroboscopy at high pitch

Abstract A voice laboratory is an expensive proposition when the most current equipment options are purchased; consequently, a voice examination can be an expensive proposition. An examiner may have the latest equipment and high technology offers the ability to see larynx anatomy and function in finer detail than in the past. However, even if one does not have the highest technology available, knowing what can be seen with the best equipment helps to understand and interpret the findings when using low technology. 

Sounds like a great neurolaryngology conference put on by the Neurolaryngolgy Study Group, coming up at the American Laryngological Association Meeting on Wednesday May 14 at 5 pm by Jean-Paul Marie on laryngeal reinnervation surgery. The topic: "Ten years experience in selective bilateral reinnervation of the larynx." It will be at Ceasar's Palace, in room Roman I/III, the same room as the ALA meeting at COSM that afternoon.

Anterior commissure detachment of vocal cords

This is an abstract I have submitted for the Fall Voice Conference in San Antonio, Texas.  

Compensating during a diagnosis

During an examination, people hate to be embarrassed--they naturally and fairly immediately try to compensate for any hoarseness. It is fortunate that there is redundancy in the vocal system so compensation is usually available to maintain sound production even when there is a problem. However, for the examiner, compensation tends to hide a voice disorder, both audibly as well as visually. Some common instances hidden by compensation include mucosal disorders on the edge of the vocal cord or weakness from neurologic and muscular disorders.

The hyoid bone (top yellow) is connected to the tongue and jaw muscles above and the thyroid cartilage below. The thyroid cartilage (central blue) is also known as the Adams Apple and protects the vocal cords which are attached on the backside in the middle. The cricoid cartilage (lower green) is a complete ring supporting the bottom of the larynx.

Sipping espresso in Ken’s Boulangerie & Cafe, I hear the background noise of the espresso grinder mingling with the murmur of voices. The couple next to me are chatting in Japanese, drinking coffee and downing a pastry. I don’t understand a word, but I can hear that each person’s voice box, or more technically the larynx, is functioning well.

Wind Chimes

I have a set of wind chimes hanging from an arbor that catch my attention whenever I am out in the garden and the breeze kicks up. They were given to me by Mrs. Mary Marlboro’s niece. Mary had purchased them while in hospice with instructions for her niece to give them to me after she passed on. I had cared for Mary for several years after I removed her larynx because of a cancer.

Laryngology 101 with Dr. Thomas

Even if you are willing to faithfully believe in your surgeon’s technical skills (based on his description to you of his own technical prowess), how can you assess his diagnostic skills and his error rate, when even he cannot?

Dr. James P. Thomas explaining what voice is

Faith N. Metsan felt something begin to change in her throat one autumn afternoon. Over the next few hours, her voice just seemed to disappear. She didn’t have any other symptoms. By evening, when she tried to speak, her voice was nothing more than a whisper. Thinking this was just the beginning of laryngitis, and because work was busy, she waited for a week. When she didn’t seem to be getting better she called her primary care physician, Dr. Marcus Goodew, and made an appointment.